Thursday, 7 July 2011

Books Online

C

Introduction to C Programming
C Optimization Tutorial
Compiling C and C++ Programs on UNIX Systems - gcc/g++
Building and Using Static and Shared C Libraries
Programming in C: UNIX System Calls and Subroutines Using C
C FAQ
C Programming Class Notes
ANSI C for Programmers on UNIX Systems
Sams Teach Yourself C in 24 Hours
Sams Teach Yourself C in 21 Days (4th Ed.)
The Standard C Library for Linux - Part 1: file functions
The Standard C Library for Linux - Part 2: character input/output
The Standard C Library for Linux - Part 3: formatted input/output
The Standard C Library for Linux - Part 4: Character Handling
The Standard C Library for Linux - Part 5: Miscellaneous Functions
Programming in C: A Tutorial
An Introduction to C Development on Linux
C Programming Course
C Language Tutorial
CScene: An Online Magazine for C and C++ Programming

C++

C++ Tutorial
Understanding C++: An Accelerated Introduction
An Introduction to C++ Class Hierarchies
G++ FAQ
Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming Using C++
Compiling C and C++ Programs on UNIX Systems - gcc/g++
C++ FAQ Lite
C++ Programming Language Tutorials
Reducing Dependencies in C++
C++ Exception Handling
Part 1: Unicode
Part 2: A Complete String Class
Making C++ Loadable Modules Work
Sams Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days (2nd Ed.)
C++ Portability Guide
C++ Tips
C++ Language Tutorial
CScene: An Online Magazine for C and C++ Programming
C++ Libraries FAQ

CGI

CGI Programming Tutorial
CGI Programming 101
CGI Manual of Style
CGI Developer's Guide
CGI Programming Unleashed
Sams Teach Yourself CGI Programming with Perl 5 in a Week (2nd Ed.)
CGI/Perl Tips, Tricks and Hints
A Tour of HTML Forms and CGI Scripts
Reading CGI Data: URL-Encoding and the CGI Protocol
CGI Programming FAQ

CORBA

CORBA FAQ
A Brief Tutorial on CORBA
CORBA 2.0 Specification
CORBA Tutorials
Sams Teach Yourself CORBA in 14 Days
Linux Network Programming, Part 3 - CORBA: The Software Bus
CORBA Program Development, Part 1
CORBA Program Development, Part 2
CORBA Program Development, Part 3

CSS

CSS2 Tutorial

CVS

CVS Tutorial
Concurrent Version System Tutorial

DHTML

Introduction to Dynamic HTML

Emacs

Emacs: The Software Engineer's ``Swiss Army Knife''
Emacs FAQ
GNU Emacs Lisp Reference Manual
Programming in Emacs Lisp
GNU Emacs Manual
A Tutorial Introduction to Emacs
EMACSulation: Internet-ready!
EMACSulation: Ediff - An Emacs interface to diff and patch
EMACSulation: Emacs as a Server
EMACSulation: Customizing Emacs
Basic Emacs
EMACSulation: Templating Mechanisms
Emacs Macros and the Power-Macros Package
Polyglot Emacs 20.4

Expect

Advanced Programming in Expect: A Bulletproof Interface
Automating Tasks with Expect
What Can you Expect?--A Data Collection Project Using Linux

Fortran

Professional Programmer's Guide to Fortran 77
Fortran 90 and Computational Science
User Notes on Fortran Programming
Fortran Programming for Physics and Astronomy
A Fortran 90 Tutorial
Using GNU Fortran
Fortran 90: A Course for Fortran 77 Programmers
Fortran 90 for the Fortran 77 Programmer
Introduction to Fortran

GIMP

GIMP Tutorial Index
A Tutorial for Perl GIMP Users
A Scheme Tutorial for GIMP Users
GIMP Guide
The GIMP User Manual
Pseudo 3-D with GIMP
Graphical Photocomposition with GIMP
Creating Text with the GIMP
Creating Fire Effects with the GIMP
Creating and Editing Animations with GIMP
GIMP-Perl: GIMP Scripting for the Rest of Us
Writing a GIMP Plugin
GIMP: The RRU Tutorial
GIMP User FAQ
Script-Fu Tutorial
The Quick Start Guide to the GIMP, Part 1
The Quick Start Guide to the GIMP, Part 2
The Quick Start Guide to the GIMP, Part 3
The Quick Start Guide to the GIMP, Part 4

GNOME

Application Programming Using the GNOME Libraries
Part 1: Everything You Need to Get Started
Part 2: Building a Sample Genealogy Program
Part 3: Adding File Saving and Loading Using libxml
Creating GTK+ Widgets with GOB: An Easier Way to Derive New GTK+ Widgets
Handling Multipel Documents: Using the GnomeMDI Framework
Livening Things Up: Graphics Made Easy Using the GNOME Canvas
Developing Gnome Applications with Python - Part 1

GTK

GDK Reference Manual
GLib Reference Manual
GTK+ Reference Manual
The GIMP Toolkit
GTK+ FAQ
GTK V1.2 Tutorial
Drawing and Event Handling in GTK
An Introduction to the GIMP Tool Kit

Gnuplot

Constrained Dynamics
Continuum Dynamics
Differential Equation Basics
Energy Functions and Stiffness
Particle System Dynamics
An Introduction to Physically Based Modeling
Rigid Body Dynamics I
Rigid Body Dynamics II
Scientific Visualization Tutorials
Gnuplot - An Interactive Plotting Program
GIF Animation Tutorial

HTML

HTML Table Tutorial
HTML by Example
How to Use HTML 3.2
Creating a Client-Side Image Map
Advanced HTML: How to Create Complex Multimedia Documents for the Web
The ABCs of HTML
Sharky's Netscape Frames Tutorial

ILU

ILU Reference Manual
Using ILU with ANSI C: A Tutorial
Using ILU with Java: A Tutorial
Using ILU with Python: A Tutorial

IP-Masquerading

ipchains: Packet Filtering for Linux 2.2
Setting Up IP Masquerade
Setting Up IP-Masquerading
Ipchains: Easy Links to the Net
Linux Networking Using Ipchains

IPC

Advanced 4.4BSD Interpprocess Communication Tutorial
UNIX Multi-Process Programming and IPC

Java

Enterprise JavaBeans Tutorial
JavaBeans Short Course
Introduction to the JavaBeans API
JDBC Short Course
Essentials of the Java Programming Language, Part 1
Essentials of the Java Programming Language, Part 2
Writing Advanced Applications for the Java Platform
Fundamentals of Java Security
Fundamentals of Java Servlets
Introduction to the Collections Framework
Introduction to CORBA
Fundamentals of RMI
Advanced
Introductory
Intermediate
Java Language Specification
Java Tutorial: Servlet Trail
Java Virtual Machine Specification (2nd Ed.)
Glossary of Java and Related Terms
The Java Language Environment
Java Look and Feel Design Guidelines
Story of a Servlet: An Instant Tutorial
Introduction to Java
Java2D: An Introduction and Tutorial
Java Servlet Tutorial
comp.lang.java FAQ
Brewing Java: A Tutorial
Shlurrrppp ... Java: The First User-Friendly Tutorial on Java
Swing Tutorial
Swing: A Quick Tutorial for AWT Programmers
Thinking in Java
Java RMI Tutorial
Java for C++ Programmers
The Advanced Jav/aJ2EE Tutorial
Hacking Java: The Java Professional's Resource Kit
JFC Unleashed
Java Developer's Guide
Java Developer's Reference
Sams Teach Yourself Java in 21 Days (Professional Reference Ed.)
Java Unleashed (2nd Ed.)
Java 1.1 Unleashed (3rd Ed.)
Java Game Programming Tutorial
Java Networking FAQ
Java Tutorial: A Practical Guide for Programmers
Sockets Programming in Java
Programming with Java - Part I
Programming with Java - Part II
Setting Up a Java Development Environment for Linux
Understanding Java
Beginner's Guide to JDK
GUI Development in Java
Java Servlets: An introduction to writing and running Java servlets on Linux

JavaScript

Introductory JavaScript Tutorials
JavaScript Authoring Guide
Client-Side JavaScript 1.3 Guide
Client-Side JavaScript 1.3 Reference
Core JavaScript 1.4 Guide
Core JavaScript 1.4 Reference
Server-Side JavaScript 1.4 Guide
JavaScript FAQ
JavaScript Tutorial
The Way of JavaScript
Voodoo's Introduction to JavaScript
JavaScript Tutorial for Programmers
JavaScript Primer
EchoEcho JavaScript Tutorial
Sams Teach Yourself JavaScript 1.1 in a Week (2nd Ed.)

Lisp

Common Lisp Hints
Common Lisp the Language (2nd Ed.)
Lisp FAQ
Lisp Programming Tutorial
Lisp Tutorial
LISP Tutorial
Common Lisp HyperSpec

MIDI

Basic MIDI Tutorials
Tutorial on MIDI and Music Synthesis

ML

ML Tutorial
Programming in Standard ML '97 

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Wednesday, 6 July 2011

Nine Things Successful People Do Differently

Why have you been so successful in reaching some of your goals, but not others? If you aren't sure, you are far from alone in your confusion. It turns out that even brilliant, highly accomplished people are pretty lousy when it comes to understanding why they succeed or fail. The intuitive answer — that you are born predisposed to certain talents and lacking in others — is really just one small piece of the puzzle. In fact, decades of research on achievement suggests that successful people reach their goals not simply because of who they are, but more often because of what they do

1. Get specific. When you set yourself a goal, try to be as specific as possible. "Lose 5 pounds" is a better goal than "lose some weight," because it gives you a clear idea of what success looks like. Knowing exactly what you want to achieve keeps you motivated until you get there. Also, think about the specific actions that need to be taken to reach your goal. Just promising you'll "eat less" or "sleep more" is too vague — be clear and precise. "I'll be in bed by 10pm on weeknights" leaves no room for doubt about what you need to do, and whether or not you've actually done it.

2. Seize the moment to act on your goals.
Given how busy most of us are, and how many goals we are juggling at once, it's not surprising that we routinely miss opportunities to act on a goal because we simply fail to notice them. Did you really have no time to work out today? No chance at any point to return that phone call? Achieving your goal means grabbing hold of these opportunities before they slip through your fingers.
To seize the moment, decide when and where you will take each action you want to take, in advance. Again, be as specific as possible (e.g., "If it's Monday, Wednesday, or Friday, I'll work out for 30 minutes before work.") Studies show that this kind of planning will help your brain to detect and seize the opportunity when it arises, increasing your chances of success by roughly 300%.
3. Know exactly how far you have left to go. Achieving any goal also requires honest and regular monitoring of your progress — if not by others, then by you yourself. If you don't know how well you are doing, you can't adjust your behavior or your strategies accordingly. Check your progress frequently — weekly, or even daily, depending on the goal.

4. Be a realistic optimist.
When you are setting a goal, by all means engage in lots of positive thinking about how likely you are to achieve it. Believing in your ability to succeed is enormously helpful for creating and sustaining your motivation. But whatever you do, don't underestimate how difficult it will be to reach your goal. Most goals worth achieving require time, planning, effort, and persistence. Studies show that thinking things will come to you easily and effortlessly leaves you ill-prepared for the journey ahead, and significantly increases the odds of failure.

5. Focus on getting better, rather than being good.
Believing you have the ability to reach your goals is important, but so is believing you can get the ability. Many of us believe that our intelligence, our personality, and our physical aptitudes are fixed — that no matter what we do, we won't improve. As a result, we focus on goals that are all about proving ourselves, rather than developing and acquiring new skills.
Fortunately, decades of research suggest that the belief in fixed ability is completely wrong — abilities of all kinds are profoundly malleable. Embracing the fact that you can change will allow you to make better choices, and reach your fullest potential. People whose goals are about getting better, rather than being good, take difficulty in stride, and appreciate the journey as much as the destination.

6. Have grit.
Grit is a willingness to commit to long-term goals, and to persist in the face of difficulty. Studies show that gritty people obtain more education in their lifetime, and earn higher college GPAs. Grit predicts which cadets will stick out their first grueling year at West Point. In fact, grit even predicts which round contestants will make it to at the Scripps National Spelling Bee.
The good news is, if you aren't particularly gritty now, there is something you can do about it. People who lack grit more often than not believe that they just don't have the innate abilities successful people have. If that describes your own thinking .... well, there's no way to put this nicely: you are wrong. As I mentioned earlier, effort, planning, persistence, and good strategies are what it really takes to succeed. Embracing this knowledge will not only help you see yourself and your goals more accurately, but also do wonders for your grit.
7. Build your willpower muscle. Your self-control "muscle" is just like the other muscles in your body — when it doesn't get much exercise, it becomes weaker over time. But when you give it regular workouts by putting it to good use, it will grow stronger and stronger, and better able to help you successfully reach your goals.
To build willpower, take on a challenge that requires you to do something you'd honestly rather not do. Give up high-fat snacks, do 100 sit-ups a day, stand up straight when you catch yourself slouching, try to learn a new skill. When you find yourself wanting to give in, give up, or just not bother — don't. Start with just one activity, and make a plan for how you will deal with troubles when they occur ("If I have a craving for a snack, I will eat one piece of fresh or three pieces of dried fruit.") It will be hard in the beginning, but it will get easier, and that's the whole point. As your strength grows, you can take on more challenges and step-up your self-control workout.
8. Don't tempt fate. No matter how strong your willpower muscle becomes, it's important to always respect the fact that it is limited, and if you overtax it you will temporarily run out of steam. Don't try to take on two challenging tasks at once, if you can help it (like quitting smoking and dieting at the same time). And don't put yourself in harm's way — many people are overly-confident in their ability to resist temptation, and as a result they put themselves in situations where temptations abound. Successful people know not to make reaching a goal harder than it already is.

9. Focus on what you will do, not what you won't do. Do you want to successfully lose weight, quit smoking, or put a lid on your bad temper? Then plan how you will replace bad habits with good ones, rather than focusing only on the bad habits themselves. Research on thought suppression (e.g., "Don't think about white bears!") has shown that trying to avoid a thought makes it even more active in your mind. The same holds true when it comes to behavior — by trying not to engage in a bad habit, our habits get strengthened rather than broken.
If you want change your ways, ask yourself, What will I do instead? For example, if you are trying to gain control of your temper and stop flying off the handle, you might make a plan like "If I am starting to feel angry, then I will take three deep breaths to calm down." By using deep breathing as a replacement for giving in to your anger, your bad habit will get worn away over time until it disappears completely.


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